Panels

THE PROPOSALS FOR THE DISCUSSION PANELS

I. THREATS TO INTERNATIONAL SECURITY IN CYBERSPACE:
1. Identification of threats in cyberspace
2. Threats in cyberspace arising from the development of new technologies
3. Forms and methods of offensive attack in cyberspace
4. The kinetic consequences of cyberspace attacks
5. Monitoring and detection of threats in cyberspace
6. The objectives and intentions of the Russian Federation to offensive engage in cyberspace
7. Evaluation of offensive activities carried out by the Russian Federation in cyberspace. Case study
8. Defensive activities in cyberspace
9. Cyber Warfare
10. Lessons learnt from negative and positive measures in cyberspace to its security
11. Security policy in cyberspace
12. Cyber security strategies (NATO, EU, Russian Federation, Poland and others)
13. Utilizing cyberspace to influence society through social media
14. Cyber security and new media
15. The objectives, forms and methods of integrating the aggressive utilisation of cyberspace with other instruments of influence in international relations

 

II. THREATS TO NATO SECURITY:
1. Evolution of NATO crisis management process
2. Identification of  threats to NATO
3. NATO adaptation to hybrid warfare
4. NATO’s strategy towards the Russian Federation
5. Strengthening the NATO Eastern flank
6. Changes in NATO’s strategic decision-making process
7. Directions of changes in NATO’s strategic deterrence (nuclear, non-nuclear, non-military)
8. Ensuring security in the Baltic Sea and Black Sea regions
9. Readines NATO to war and strategic mobility
10. NATO’s response to Russian A2/AD capabilities
11. Eastern flank NATO strategy
12. The role of NATO/US in Central and Eastern Europe
13. NATO strategy utilizing of space
14. Increasing NATO against hybrid threats
15. Forecast of the Russian Federation threats to NATO
 
III. THREATS TO EUROPEAN UNION:
1. The perception of the threats posed by the Russian Federation by the European Union
2. The consequences of the threats to EU security
3. Strengthening resilince EU against hybrid threats
4. Sanctions imposed on the Russian Federation
5. The EU’s policy towards the Russian Federation
6. Directions of changes in relations between the EU and the Russian Federation

 

IV. THREATS COMMING FROM THE DEVELOPMENT OF NEW TECHNOLOGIES:
1. Unmanned aerial vehicle weapons
2. Artificial intelligence
3. Nanotechnologies
4. Biotechnologies
5. Genetic engineering
6. Hypersonic weapon
7. Use of space

 

V. THREATS TO SECURITY CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE :
1. Identification of threats to critical infrastructure
2. Threats to cyberspace security
3. Threats to physical security
4. Threats to personal security
5. Risks of threats to critical infrastructure
6. Enhancing the resilience of critical infrastructure to threats
7. Vulnerability of critical infrastructure 
8. Critical Infrastructure security management
 
VI. THREATS RESULTING FROM ALL RUSSIAN INSTRUMENTS OF POWER:
1. Threats arising from the military instrument
2. Risks arising from the economic instrument
3. Risks arising from information instrument
4. Threats arising from diplomacy

 

VII. THREATS RESULTING FROM THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION POLICY:
1. Russian Federation’s policy towards NATO
2. The Russian Federation’s policy towards the EU
3. The Russian Federation’s policy towards the USA
4. The Russian Federation’s policy towards post-Soviet states
5. The Russian Federation’s policy towards Central Europe
The Russian Federation’s policy towards the Baltic Sea Region
6. The Russian Federation’s policy towards the Black Sea region
7. The policy of selected countries towards the Russian Federation

 

VIII. THREATS RESULTING FROM DOCTRINAL DOCUMENTS OF THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION:
1. Russian Federation policy concept
2. National security strategy o Russian Federation
3. The Military doctrine of the Russian Federation
4. Other documents

 

IX. THREATS RESULTING FROM THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION ARMED FORCES:
1. Transformation of the Russian Federation armed forces
2. Structure, dislocation and combat readines of armed forces
3. Russia antiaccess capabilities
4. Russian Federation deferrence
5. Russian vision confrontation with the West
6. Hybrid Warfare and its consequences

 

X. INNOVATIVE INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS TECHNOLOGIES WITHIN THE CHANGING SECURITY ENVIRONMENT:
1. Future Learning Ecosystem – Towards Digitalization 
2. Artificial Intelligence – the Race with the Time
3. Virtual Reality within the Security Environment
4. Social Media within the Fake News Context
5. E-learning Revival. Quality really matters
6. Microlearning
7. Mobile Learning
8. Massive Open On-line Courses (MOOC)
9. Learning Analitycs – xAPI Context